#self publishing…the free promotion

4 things to note:  the value of a writing group; how to get access to a free promotion; connecting with small groups through email; Kindle apps for all

Well, one thing that keeps popping up in my marketing research, and which of course makes sense, is to offer a free copy of my book to people. So, this is my first strategy to get this thing rockin and rollin.

  • Kindle Select is the vehicle through which my strategy is possible. When you enroll in Kindle Select, you, the publisher, agree not to sell your book anywhere else during a 90-day period. They offer benefits in return, one of which is 5 days, not necessarily consecutive, during the 90 day period in which I can offer my book free of charge.
  • In order to proceed, I emailed small groups of folks that I know. For example, I have a small group of friends in a nearby town that I emailed about the promotion. It felt more personal than just sending a mass email. I wrote them a note at the top and included the synopsis below.
  • I also included a note about where to go on the Amazon page to upload Kindle devices on computers, tablets, and smart phones. People don’t realize, as I did not, that you can read on Kindle without owning a Kindle. I read many books on my iPad Kindle application.
  • The Lansing Writers’ Group was especially helpful to me this week.  I read them what is now my fourth synopsis and they told me to let go a bit of this marketing project and the topic.  It is hard, but I am just about to take the weekend off from it.

Below is the information needed if you would like to try out my book or a Kindle application on a non-Kindle reader

The following information is pertinent to anyone in the county dealing with Internet issues.  It is free information about my struggles with rural broadband during the year 2011-2012 and the support I received from the Tompkins County Legislature’s Special Committee on Broadband.  Basically, I made my blog into a Kindle book, My Rural Broadband Journey,  soon to be available in paperback.  
If you want to download it and read it this weekend, it is available free of charge on Sunday, the 10th of August.  This Sunday!
If you don’t have a Kindle, check your computer to see if it has a Kindle Reader already installed, some new versions do.
Also:  the Kindle reading application can be download to PCs, tablets, iPhones, Smart Phones, iPads, and Macs.
Go to the right hand sidebar of the linked page and click on Free Reading Ap…the computer does the rest.
Below is a synopsis:
I live ten miles from Cornell University and .6 miles from a wired connection to high-speed.  In 2011, wanting to utilize my recent Communications degree from the Park School at Ithaca College, I realized I was doomed without high-speed Internet.
 
I decided that I would drill down and find out what stood between our home and that wired connection, .6 miles down the road.  I thought a blog would be a good vehicle for recording my findings.
 
I began locally:  what did our local cable company really mean by a “survey to see how much we would have to pay for a connection? what was the franchise agreement with our local government? and why wasn’t the state and federal government helping me get connected under the rural broadband initiative?”
 
Day by day, I dug through the Internet and made phone calls to get the answers to these questions.  It wasn’t pretty:  a survey was a peek around the neighborhood by the cable company; the franchise agreement was drawn up in the 1980s before Al Gore and others made Internet a household word; and the state and federal government were sort of helping.
 
In detail, I recorded this information on my blog.  The blog itself did not see millions of hits but it got around and the hits increased over 100 percent in one years time.  It was tweeted in Great Britain and on Topsy once, a South African said I had guts.  I think there he was referring to all the things I explored and questions I asked.  
 
I researched and dug:  why did our cable company wire 50 miles in Maine for the same price as 12 miles in upstate?  why isn’t there a comprehensive  plan to connect the country?  and really what is the problem:  is it that we can’t put the collective brains in the US together to solve this problem or is that the invisible hand of the free market keeps pushing the heads of those trying under water as they keep rising to the surface to gasp for air.
 
In the end, I found help through the Tompkins County Legislature’s Special Committee on Broadband.  A group of people researched the issues and made applying for grants through government broadband initiatives doable.  But unless a community has the drive to do such work, the average citizen faces the daily hassles that I recorded in my blog. (The committee’s report is online and could be very useful to other communities seeking solutions to rural broadband.)
 
As the quest fur rural broadband goes forward, I think of a point one of my professors used to ask us repeatedly at Ithaca College:
“Why? you’ve got to ask the questions?  And they have to be the right questions?”
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©claireaperez@gmail.com